Toy Hauler Tale, Part 5

The air is crisp and cool.  The sun is just starting to peek up over the horizon.  Sunday.  The day of rest.  There is not much movement on the grounds, but I am up, and getting things in order for my long awaited departure.  I am not looking forward to waiting until 8:30 to get started with training.

 

Hi Ho, Hi Ho?

 

It’s only 7:00, but I walk over to the Technician office, and talk with the supervisor.  “Is there any way I can have someone other than my sales guy help me with the training?  I’d really like to get started.”

 

“I’ll show you myself!” he replies.  And within minutes, we are back at my truck, hooking up the toy hauler.

 

Backing up to the hitch is easy; I never moved the truck from the last time it was hooked up.  But cranking the hitch up and down was another story.  I soon find out how many of the necessary muscles I don’t have to hand crank the hitch up and down.  He helps me.  We talk about the idea of getting an electric unit installed at some point. Then I attach the stabilizer bars to the hitch.  Not too hard.  Then, once again, I struggle with getting the stabilizer bar chains on.  I can only get the 2nd link on and that is with his help.  How will I do this alone?  I hook the sway bar on.  I really don’t understand where to set it at.  He sets it.  I plug in power to the truck. Now we get into the truck to set the break.  Things are looking up and I am excited to soon be out of here!

 

HI Ho, HI Ho, It’s Off To Tow I Go….

 

Or so I thought.  

 

“Shouldn’t we check the lights first?”   I ask. 

“Yes, let’s check.”

Flashers on, headlights on, walk to the back and…..

Nothing.

None of the trailer lights are working.  He fiddles and fiddles with the switch and underneath the truck. 

Nothing.

Back to the tech shop to try to figure out what is wrong.  I hear him say to someone “what do you mean you didn’t check when you installed?” And for what seems like another hour or two, there are several guys troubleshooting what is wrong, and correcting it.  While they are working on it, the Tech supervisor attaches my temporary license to the trailer. 

 

Did I happen to mention, I am feeling so very nervous about this whole purchase experience?

 

Finally we are off on a test drive and to set the breaks.

I don’t know what I don’t know, and I don’t know what to “feel” for either.  How do you “feel” that the trailer breaks are working?  Green light, red light, the trailer stopping versus the truck trying to stop it all.  We drive around and around in the campground at 10 mph until I stop running onto the grass and cutting corners too sharp.

 

“You’ve got this.” He says.  I still feel like if I had to stop I couldn’t.  But he is reassuring, and says now he will drive us out to a highway, and I will drive us back.

He makes more adjustments on the breaks, and we head out. 

 

I like riding with this guy.  He is very comforting, and answers my questions.  Too bad he was so unavailable most of the week.  But I have him now.  If I need to stop instantly pull this nob.  If I need more or less, turn this.  But, where he has set it now, I should never have to move it again.  The road we are on is not smooth, so there is some rocking and pulling, but he assures me that’s normal.  We reach the intersection to the highway.  He pulls over.

“Now it’s your turn.” He smiles.

OMG.  Ohhh I’m in real highway traffic.  Hugging the right hand lane, 45 miles per hour, and probably needing a defibulator. Remember I have to anticipate my stops long before the stop.  I have to anticipate every Ignoramus Rex on the road who has no understanding of heavy trucks and wide turn vehicles.  I feel like I am hanging over in everyone’s way, and holding my breath doesn’t make it any better.  We pass a state patrol.  He doesn’t even glance our way.  I finally need to make a stop.  What is that jerking?

“The breaks are going to catch front and back.  You need to be a little more aggressive on the breaks, and you’ll be fine.”  I don’t really understand.  Ok I’ll try.  After only one more jerky stop, we’re already back to the dealership. 

I’ll be a pro in no time.

He gets out.

We hug, I thank him for everything. I will miss him and his techs. I know they tried.

My salesman is nowhere to be seen. 

I slowly make my long awaited escape out the dealership parking lot.

 

Free at last.

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Comments

  1. I seriously can’t believe you went through with the sale. There are so many retired people out there selling barely used trailers. I hope the nightmare is over and its smooth hauling from now on!

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